Posts Tagged With: boone nc

Monsters are Everywhere – When You’re a Puppy

The world can be a big and scary place if you’re a puppy!  As you’re socializing your puppy and taking him/her to new places, keep in mind that things that seem completely normal to you can be very frightening to a young pup.

If your puppy suddenly seems afraid of something, try getting down on his/her level to see if you can understand (A) what they’re actually afraid of and (B) what they find scary about it.  A statue in a park might not seem scary to you or me, but if you get down to a puppy’s level and look at it from that height, you may find it more intimidating than you realized.

Such was the case with Ellie the Warrior Princess earlier this week when I took her with me to get the car inspected.  As we were leaving, Ellie began to growl and bark towards the road.  It wasn’t immediately clear what was upsetting her, so I had to get down to her level and track her gaze.  That was when I realized that she had spotted a bright red fire hydrant way up on the hill by the road.

When your puppy is panicking over something you deem silly, it may be tempting just to walk away and avoid feeling like you’re causing a scene.  In reality, it goes a long way if you can help your puppy overcome that fear instead of just leaving it to linger in the back of his mind.

So, how does one help her puppy overcome a fear of a fire hydrant?  You walk up to it, crouch next to it, and pet it like a dog – all the while encouraging your puppy to come check it out with you.  I may have looked quite silly petting it and trying to introduce my puppy to a fire hydrant next to a four lane road that day, but it’s worth it to make sure she continues to gain confidence and overcome her fears.

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A few tips on overcoming fearful objects:

  1. Say hi to it yourself!  If you look like you don’t want to touch it or get near it, why on earth would you puppy want to do that?
  2. Do not coddle your pup.  Resist the urge to hold, cuddle, and coo to your dog as he backs away or growls.  Speak confidently and calmly, and make sure you convey to your pup that it’s really no big deal.
  3. Practice!  When you’re out and about and see something weird, encourage your pup to check it out, sniff it, and say hi even if he hasn’t actually noticed it yet.  Get ahead of the weird fears and suspicious thoughts – lead the charge and say hi first!

If your puppy encounters a fearful object and you aren’t able to work through it all in one sitting, try to return to the spot or object again later to continue practicing and working through the anxiety.  Avoid the temptation to drag your puppy up to something and try instead to encourage independent forward movement by making it look fun!

 

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Prince Tucker had to learn how to meet weird new objects all the time as a Future Leader Dog puppy, too!

Categories: Behavior, Blog, Ellie the Warrior Princess, Fearful dogs, Puppy, Puppy Socialization | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Puppy Teeth – do they all fall out?

Yes!

I go over some basic oral hygiene tips in my Puppy Preschool classes and I often find that first time puppy owners aren’t totally sure they understand those pointy little needles in their puppy’s mouth!

Yes, just like human children, your puppy has a set of “baby” teeth and yes, they will all fall out!  The good news is that your puppy will lose those sharp baby teeth much faster than a human kid.  Somewhere around four months, your pup will start replacing those baby teeth with adult teeth.  Even though the puppy teeth won’t be around long, do yourself a favor and go ahead and get in the habit of routine teeth brushing!

Dental care is extremely important for your dog, and it’s never too early to work on your dog’s tolerance for it.  Get in your practice with that awkward doggie toothbrush with teeth that will fall out anyway!

It’s also very important to remember that, just like a human kid, your puppy NEEDS to chew on things!  Make sure your pup has plenty of appropriate items for the teething stage – and don’t be overly alarmed if you see a little blood once in a while as teeth get loose or fall out.

We are currently going through the teething stage in our house – and we chew on a lot of nylabones and ice cubes!  You can check out the images below to see where Ellie has lost a few of her front teeth.  And before you ask, yes, those super sharp canine teeth are usually some of the last ones to go!

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Categories: Blog, Ellie the Warrior Princess, Puppy, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Prince and the Pea

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I often affectionately refer to my faithful Labrador Retriever as “Prince” Tucker. Why? Because he seems to believe he should be treated like royalty and he’s extremely picky.

While Tucker may not be quite as sensitive as the princess in the fairytale, “The Princess and the Pea,” who is able to feel one pea through twenty mattresses and twenty feather beds, he is still quite princely.

Several weeks ago, my very obedient Tucker suddenly started balking at the idea of going to bed. Tucker has slept in the same crate since he was a puppy (almost six years), and up until this point, had never had an issue with it. Our routine has always been pretty much the same – he goes outside for a break, comes inside to get his nightly pills and evening snack, and goes to bed. All of a sudden one day, he started sneaking back to his bed in the living room after his snack instead of going to his crate. When my husband or I would ask him to go to his crate, he would hang his head sadly, and, slowly but surely, plod over to his crate.

We were both quite perplexed for a while until one day when I decided to wash the mat in his crate. As I pulled it out, I realized just how thin it had become.

And that’s when it hit me: the Prince had decided he preferred the very fluffy bed in the living room over the worn out old mat in his crate.

The next weekend, I bought a new fluffy bed and laid it on top of the old mat.

And guess who doesn’t balk at going to bed anymore!

The lesson is this – sometimes, it’s necessary to apply what you know about your dog’s personality when you’re trying to figure out what’s causing a certain behavior.  Remember that dogs, like people, all see the world a little differently.

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Happy as a clam now that he has extra padding.

Categories: Behavior, Blog, Prince Tucker Problems | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Old Dogs CAN Learn New Tricks

“At what age is a dog too old to learn new tricks?”

A woman stopped me on my way into Chick-fil-a this weekend to ask this question.

My brief, simplified answer (on my way towards a delicious chicken sandwich) was this – there is no official age at which a dog stops learning, so long as they are not actually suffering from doggy dementia.

There are, however, caveats to that statement.

1. Physical limitations – don’t ask your senior dog to do something he/she is realistically unable to do, or that would cause him/her pain. If you’ve noticed your dog is slow to get up, or your vet has already confirmed some age related joint problems, shy away from teaching physically demanding tricks or tasks. If your dog’s hips are painful for him, don’t teach him a new trick that involves jumping.  Gauge your training and your “workouts” on your dog’s abilities and the reactions you observe.  Like people, some senior dogs are capable of much more than others.

2. Old habits die hard – don’t expect your older dog to easily give up habits that have been lifelong. If you’ve allowed him on the couch from puppyhood, don’t expect to teach him new furniture boundaries overnight. Remember that patience and consistency are key when trying to change a current behavior.

On your quest to teach your old dog new tricks, remember to set practical goals that are attainable for your senior dog and his/her physical/mental state.

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This is Dingo – our family dog from 1996 to 2012.  While she was definitely okay with jumping up on things (as seen here) as a younger dog, her hips began to degrade around middle age.  As a senior, we put her on medications to help with the arthritis, didn’t encourage such “dancing” or jumping, and bought a small set of stairs to help her into the car.

Categories: Blog, Senior Dogs | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

It’s Not Worth It

Before you begin reading, it is important to understand that everything I’m about to say is rooted in the following belief:

Canine Life ≠ Human Life

During this Christmas season, I have had several conversations with people about dogs and kids.  Holidays tend to put unfamiliar dogs with unfamiliar kids and, unfortunately, that sometimes leads to horrible consequences.  For the sake of the following information and advice, let’s assume that the child and dog do not belong to the same household.

  • To the PARENTS/ADULTS – I have seen many a child behave inappropriately around a dog.  Please be teaching the children in your life what it means to interact appropriately with a dog.  That means…
    • no pulling on ears, tails, or lips
    • no riding on a dog’s back like a pony
    • no poking eyeballs
    • always asking before you run up to a strange dog to pet it
    • no sitting on the dog
    • no removing toys/bones from the dog’s mouth unless you’re told it’s okay

If the child is too young to fully understand those lessons, then that child should always be ACTIVELY supervised when interacting with the dog.  It’s your job as the adult to watch the child, watch the dog’s body language, and end the playtime as soon as you see signs of stress for the dog (or child).  Even if the child IS old enough to know these lessons, it’s always a good idea to supervise playtime when your child is with someone else’s pet, especially if you are unsure how the dog will respond.

  • To the OWNERS/ADULTS – I have seen many dogs with aggressive or impatient tendencies be allowed to interact with children far past the point when it was safe.  Please be willing to put your dog away or use protective gear if you are unsure how your dog might react to the quick moving, unpredictable actions of a child.  That means…
    • utilizing a crate to keep the dog secure and separate from children (make sure the child is not allowed (or not able) to poke the dog through the bars)
    • putting the dog away in a closed off room or yard away from the stress and commotion
    • using a muzzle if the dog has no choice but to be out around children (make sure to introduce it properly and to get one that allows the dog to breathe/pant freely – don’t forget to take breaks and offer water)

You may be appalled that I would suggest the use of a muzzle, but if that muzzle keeps a child from loosing an eye, getting a scar, or even receiving a lethal bite, isn’t it worth it?  And remember, just because a small dog or toy breed can’t kill you, that doesn’t mean it can’t take a child’s eye out or cause serious physical/emotional damage.

This holiday season, be wise when it comes to dogs and kids.  Remember that dogs are still animals and that it’s your job as the adult to supervise, mediate, and sometimes restrict interaction between kids and dogs if there are any signs of aggression.  A bitten child is not worth it!

Above – Photos from Tucker’s trip to Savannah, GA, spring 2012.  We met this child on the street with his family.  His father made sure to ask if it was okay to pet him and the kid had pretty good manners when it came to petting gently.  You’ll also notice that I’m not standing several feet away talking to my friends or the kid’s family – I’m sitting right next to Tucker, watching his behavior, watching the kid, and making sure that everyone stays happy and healthy.  You’ll see in the first photo that the kid went in for a “hug” of Tucker’s head.  Tucker is okay with hugs, but not all dogs feel the same.  If your dog is great with petting and head scratches but not a fan of hugs, don’t be afraid to tell people who approach you that a hug is not okay!  (Photo Credit – Beth Anne Ho)

Categories: Behavior, Dogs and Kids, Holidays | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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